May 3, 2016

CAQ and AAA Auditing Section Announce Four Awards for Access to Audit Personnel Program (May 2016)

Washington, DC - The Center for Audit Quality (CAQ) and the Auditing Section of the American Accounting Association (AAA) today announced four awards for the Access to Audit Personnel Program including projects to explore client accountability and auditor evidence collection. This is the fourth year that the CAQ and the AAA Auditing Section have supported this program that facilitates the ability of accounting and auditing academic scholars to acquire access to audit firm personnel who participate in their research projects. The lead researcher on these projects are either doctoral students or tenure-track professors. From the 25 proposals received this year, the Review Committee selected the following projects to support:

  1. A Bright Side to Client Accountability: Accountability to the Client Enhances the Quality and Independence of Auditor Judgment when Accuracy Goals Are Primed by Emily Griffith, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kathryn Kadous, Emory University; and Donald Young, The Georgia Institute of Technology
  2. Does Implementing an Auditor Judgment Rule Increase Auditors’ Likelihood of Conducting More Innovative Procedures? by Yoon Kang, University of Massachusetts – Amherst; David Piercey, University of Massachusetts – Amherst; and Andrew Trotman, Northeastern University
  3. The Impact of Inferences About Work Paper Default Options on Auditors’ Sensitivity to Changes in Risk by Tracie Majors, University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign; Sarah Bonner, University of Southern California; and Stacey Ritter, University of Southern California
  4. Improving Auditors’ Evidence Collection and Evaluation by Mitigating the Impact of Conflicting Incentives by Daniel Zhou, Emory University

“The Access to Audit Personnel program has been an effective way to assist researchers in obtaining the necessary participation from multiple audit firms for their research,” said Executive Director Cindy Fornelli “I am pleased that the CAQ’s Governing Board has agreed to expand their support for behavioral research by modifying the application criteria to include projects led by tenure track professors next year. We will continue to reserve a number of projects for young scholars as well.”

“Our partnership with the CAQ has been extremely valuable, in terms of facilitating a connection and an ongoing dialogue between the academics and practitioners,” said AAA Auditing Section President Chris Hogan in a recent Profession in Focus interview. “We truly appreciate the support that the CAQ and its eight Governing Board firms provide to our academics in their goal to conduct meaningful research.” The Review Committee of audit partners and senior academics evaluated the proposals based on such factors as ability to address research questions that are important to practice, methodological soundness and contribution to academic literature. An estimated 580 audit staff of varying levels from the eight CAQ Governing Board firms will be asked to participate in these four research projects.

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About the AAA The American Accounting Association promotes worldwide excellence in accounting education, research and practice. The Association is a voluntary organization of persons interested in accounting education and research. For more information, visit www.aaahq.org.

About the CAQ The Center for Audit Quality (CAQ) is an autonomous, nonpartisan public policy organization dedicated to enhancing investor confidence and public trust in the global capital markets. The CAQ fosters high quality performance by public company auditors, convenes and collaborates with other stakeholders to advance the discussion of critical issues requiring action and intervention, and advocates policies and standards that promote public company auditors’ objectivity, effectiveness, and responsiveness to dynamic market conditions. Based in Washington, DC, the CAQ is affiliated with the American Institute of CPAs.